content marketing worth it

How to Convince Your Boss Content Marketing is Worth It

content marketing worth it

“What’s the point of content marketing, anyway?” It’s a question many in-house marketers hear from those higher up the chain. It doesn’t matter that YOU know it’s worth it; the question is how to convince your C-level colleagues that this kind of marketing is worth their investment. My experience of doing this shows that there are four areas you need to cover to show what content marketing can achieve.

1. Paint a Picture

First of all, it’s important to show the evidence that content marketing works from sources the executives will trust. That means bringing out the heavy hitters like Gartner, Forrester and Pew Internet to present statistics like:

  • In 2015, 12% of marketing budgets will be spent on content marketing (Gartner)
  • Businesses need to allocate dedicated resources to content marketing to achieve its potential (Forrester)

You can also show the benefits many businesses get such as traffic, engagement, leads, sales and more.

2. Create a Baseline

At the same time, create a baseline for where the company is now. Look at:

  • your social media profiles, paying attention to branding, activity and engagement
  • your web and social traffic
  • blog content publishing and related social sharing activity
  • other content publishing initiatives

Then see how all of these translate into leads and or sales. This tells you where you’re starting from. Put these in a spreadsheet before you move on to the next step.

3. Set Realistic Expectations and Goals

This is where you create your plan, moving from what’s achievable from your current position. In other words, if your Twitter account is dormant, it’s not realistic to expect it to bring hundreds of people to your website. But you can set some goals for:

  • getting more of your customers to sign up for your email newsletter
  • increasing your social media mentions and conversations (the numbers will follow)
  • boosting the numbers of people who decide to download your free report
  • connecting with customers
  • expanding your digital footprint

All of this helps you to build trust with your customers, which takes time. It’s like the difference between a first date and a one year anniversary date. Content marketing helps you bridge that gap.

4. Measure and Report

Once you know what your goals are, it’s all about robust reporting. Luckily, there are plenty of tools to help with that.

  • Almost all social media sites have some form of analytics so you can track the raw numbers, and there are plenty of other social analytics tools that show how your content is doing across the spectrum.
  • Web analytics helps you figure out which content is doing best, and how your content affects search engine positioning, web traffic and social sharing.
  • Email marketing providers also have analytics on opens and clicks.

You could also track everything at once with an all in one dashboard like Cyfe or Hubspot, or simply enter updated figures in the spreadsheet you created in step 2.

Whichever method you choose, you will soon be able to see the impact of your content marketing efforts, so you can report on it to the people who are paying your salary.

And if you still need more, check out these compelling arguments for the ROI of content marketing from the Content Marketing Institute.

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7 types of content

7 Types of Content to Include in Your Strategy and Why {Part 2}

7 types of content

In my last post, I looked at the importance of including long form articles, data rich infographics and online video in your content strategy. Now here are four more content types to round your strategy out.

4. Social Media Posts

The mobile shift provides another reason to do social media well. Statistics from ShareThis show that people are twice as likely to share content from mobile devices as from the desktop. So creating shareable social media content is a must.

For this, it’s essential to think beyond the tweet. Short social media updates have their place, but it’s also important to include:

  • images, which can be easily shared on all networks
  • media, which many social sites embed
  • longer social posts, for Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+

In many cases, you can share the content you already have, but make sure to share content from others too – self-promotion must take a back seat to the goal of engaging your audience by the breadth and quality of what you share. It’s the best way to get attention for your brand.

For networks that allow longer posts, take some time to craft summaries of the key points and add a question for discussion to increase your options for engagement.

5. Educational Ebooks

With digital publishing on the rise, ebooks have become an important promotional tool for business. As Hubspot says, ebooks are a great way to educate your prospects while starting a relationship with them. Ebooks also show your knowledge and can be the first step in getting those leads into the sales funnel.

You have two options for creating your ebook: using content you already have or authoring an ebook from scratch. If you do a lot of presentations and have an active blog, it’s easy to choose the most popular topics as the seed for an ebook. Alternatively, you may prefer to use an ebook to answer the questions that most customers have about your products or services.

With the help of a professional writer (and maybe a little bit of design assistance, too), you can create an ebook that is valuable and easy to read, which makes it more likely that readers will be interested in your next offer. This is something Hubspot does extremely well.

6. White Papers

From the outside, white papers may seem identical to ebooks, but they are not (though I believe the gap between them is shrinking and some people use the terms interchangeably). White papers typically focus on a customer problem, examine some of the failed or flawed approaches to that problem and show how your product or service can solve it. They tend to be more formal than ebooks and can be a good way of showing topic expertise. Many white papers are data-driven, sharing business and industry statistics to make the case.

If you are in the B2B market, then you can’t afford to ignore white papers. As white paper expert Mike Stelzner points out, they are an excellent lead generation tool, are widely shared and are used to help businesses evaluate solutions to their most pressing issues.

7. Lead Converting Webinars

Lewis Howes believes that webinars are one of the most effective ways of converting leads to customers. Since most webinars are free, there’s no barrier to entry, but only people who are already interested in the topic sign up, effectively pre-qualifying themselves. A webinar gives you the chance to talk to people for around 45-60 minutes in a focused way that’s almost impossible on social media.

Webinars also allow you to offer more value to customers and prospects by partnering with experts and by taking the chance to explain complex concepts. The more people understand, the more the realize why your product or service could be a good fit for them.

Don’t be fooled: webinars are hard work, so it’s worth getting help to brainstorm topics and potential partners, work out the structure and create the slides. Then you can focus on what you do best by delivering the presentation and talking to attendees.

Add these seven types of content to blog posts for a well rounded content strategy that allows you to attract and retain customers no matter where they are in the sales funnel.

Learn how Crackerjack Marketing can help you get leads and sales with ebooks, white papers and webinars.

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types of content marketing

7 Types of Content to Include in Your Strategy and Why {Part 1}

types of content marketing

When creating content, a good rule is to make it deep and wide. That’s why you have to think beyond the blog when developing your content strategy. Don’t get me wrong; blogging remains one of the most important ways to increase your influence and authority and to grow both trust and traffic, but why stop there? To get the full benefits of inbound marketing, you need to create shareable content.

So how do you determine what’s sharable? BuzzSumo is a tool that tracks what content performs best on your site or your competitor’s site. (It’s a powerful tool!) When I performed a recent search there, I found that the most shareworthy content included articles, infographics and video.

1. Long Form Articles

You’re probably thinking that you already write articles in the form of blog posts, but here’s an important point: some of the most shared articles are the ones with the most depth. Buffer used Medium’s data to figure out that the ideal length for a blog posts is 1600 words.

Research from BuzzSumo’s analysis of 100 million articles (a pretty compelling data set, wouldn’t you say?) shows that the longer the content is, the more it gets shared. That means long-form blog content is just as important to your content strategy as shorter pieces.

2. Data Rich Infographics

At their best, infographics make it easy to get a lot of information in a neat, visually appealing package. And according to QuickSprout, they are great for traffic and branding too. The human brain finds visuals easy to remember and much more engaging.

You already have the business data. All you have to do is extract the most interesting statistics and package it to create a data-rich infographic that is easy to share (like this one on social media mistakes). Even average infographics get hundreds of shares; produce something stellar and thousands of people could connect with you. Easel.ly has a list of the characteristics of great infographics to help you get started.

3. Online Video

You already know that you can’t ignore the mobile market, but did you also know that more than 20% of all online video is watched on mobile devices (Tweet This!)? Research published on eMarketer shows that 90% of millennials watch smartphone video and 77% watch video on their tablets. With mobile devices usage continuing to increase, businesses looking to market to millennials (and which businesses aren’t?) need to get into the game. Some types of video to consider include:

  • introductions to yourself and your business
  • answers to customer questions
  • videos that piggyback on a popular issue

You can even create video that speaks directly to your audience’s self-image as Dove did successfully last year with its Real Beauty Sketches.

In my next post, I’ll look at four more content types that you should include. In the meantime, ask us how Crackerjack Marketing can help you create long form content, infographics and online video.

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What Brands Can Learn About Social Media From Game of Thrones

What Brands Can Learn About Social Media From Game of Thrones

What Brands Can Learn About Social Media From Game of Thrones

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social media doesn’t just emulate life. In some ways, it emulates television too, especially good television like Game of Thrones. If you’re a fan, read on to learn what Game of Thrones has to teach those of us who work with brands who strive for social media success. Not a fan yet? There’s still plenty to learn here. Read up, avoid the spoiler (towards the end), and then start watching.

A Little Social Listening Goes a Long Way

Varys, aka The Spider, has little birds that bring him news. He can’t be everywhere at the same time, but his little birdies keep him on top of things. The same concept applies to social listening tools. You can’t be everywhere or listen to everyone on the Internet at all times. Skip the little birds, though, and use a social media monitoring tool, such as Radian6 or CustomScoop, to find out what people are saying about your brand and its products and services.

Step out of the Box and Try New Things

Life is pretty dull if you do the same things day in and day out. Jon Snow is a natural risk taker. First, he took up a post on The Wall, and in Season 3, he got frisky with Ygritte, a Wildling. He must later account for his actions (Season 4), but even then, he’s not content to settle for what’s always been done. Knowing that the Wildlings plan to strike Castle Black, with the White Walkers to up their odds, he argues for going on the offense rather than staying put to defend the castle. He also wants to seal the tunnel under Castle Black to keep enemies out.

Ser Alliser Thorne is adamant about staying put. His argument? They’ve never done it before, and they won’t do it now. Jon, on the other hand, is all about trying something new to get better results. Fortunately, for social media users, trying new things isn’t as risky as joining The Night’s Watch or fighting White Walkers. Be proactive about trying new initiatives in addition to continuing the tried and true. This is critical for reaching more of your target audience and keeping its members interested. As in the Game of Thrones, complacency has no place in social media.

Get a Great Team 

Daenerys Targaryen, or Khaleesi (whatever you choose to call her), has something going for her that every business social media user should have. No, it’s not the ability to walk through fire, though that could come in handy. Instead, it’s an awesome team. The Dragon Queen Ladyhas a translator, advisors, a community manager, and an entire army of advocates. That army? She’s not dragging it along for the ride or threatening it into submission. Her soldiers are with her voluntarily because she won them over. You can do the same with members of your own audience, and they will become advocates of your brand.

Be a Giver

Back in Season 2 of Game of Thrones, brave little Arya Stark made friends with Jaqen H’ghar and then managed to save his life. How did he return the favor (three times over)? Well, he offered to kill three people for her (because “only death can repay life”). While we certainly don’t advocate killing anyone, there is an important social media lesson to be learned from Jaqen H’ghar: Always give more than you get. Be generous with your retweets, shares, and promotion of your community’s content. Jaqen H’ghar received something valuable from Arya before he became a giver, but social media users should deviate a bit from his example. With social media, it’s important to start giving before you get anything in return. Still, the main principle is the same.

Show Them the Money 

There’s so much we could learn from Tyrion Lannister in terms of using wit. But since we are still awaiting his fate in the season finale (or perhaps the next season premiere), it’s too soon to draw any parallels here. One thing we can learn for sure, though, is that money talks and, well, you know the rest. This is especially true when it comes to advocates. Tyrion has paid Bronn handsomely for his services. In exchange, Bronn has been a loyal and dedicated protector. I know you’re probably thinking of how {Warning! Warning! Spoiler alert! Skip to the end if you haven’t made your way through this season yet!} Bronn has decided not to testify for Tyrion at his trial. The same lesson applies here, though. Bronn received a better offer, and again we see what happens when you show them the money. Keep in mind, too, that even though Bronn is no longer Tyrion’s paid advocate, he isn’t testifying against him either. The takeaway? Yes, it’s nice when we get something for free, but value your advocates and compensate them well.

There’s one more thing you can learn from the characters of Game of Thrones: Always seize the day. Apply these tips today to make sure you won’t miss a single opportunity to grow your social media network and meet your business goals.

 

Content Marketing: 5 Goals for Your Business

Content Marketing: 5 Goals for Your Business

Content Marketing: 5 Goals for Your Business

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When using content marketing for your business, you probably have one, very clear main goal in mind: making more sales. However, there are a bunch of other goals that help you achieve this one. Having a firm idea of what they are will help you gain perspective and make sure your content marketing efforts are moving in the right direction.

  1. Traffic: One of your main goals with content marketing should be an increase in traffic. You’ll need to get more people interested in your products or services if you want to sell more of them. Create content that helps you get as much traffic as possible.
  2. Engagement: Tons of traffic means little if the people who visit your page aren’t really interested in what you have to say. You want to create content that stimulates long, quality interaction. To do this, you’ll need to create content that is not only relevant to the audience you want to engage but also likely to capture and hold its attention. Keep in mind that a good design and layout can help you increase engagement as well. If your layout is crappy, many visitors won’ stick around long enough to read your content.
  3. Social Media Success:  Social media can help you get the word about your business out there, helping not only to improve visibility and increase traffic but also to boost your reputation. You want to create content that gets more followers, shares, comments, retweets, and likes.
  4. Backlinks: Many people, especially those just getting a feel for content marketing, underestimate the importance of backlinks. Others may simply theorize that they aren’t as important as they were in the past. Both of these positions are mistakes. Backlinks are important for two major reasons. First, they help you increase traffic. Second, they help boost your search engine authority, which ensures that more people see your pages in their search results. Of course, backlinks from just any site won’t do. You only want links from reputable sites.
  5. Conversions: Ultimately, you want content that helps you convert your traffic. Keep in mind, however, that this doesn’t always mean sales conversions. Often, you are directing your visitors towards another action instead. For example, you may want visitors to sign up for your newsletter or online course. Well-crafted calls to action help.

Keep these goals in mind as you create content for your business. And be sure to track your results. Monitoring what works and what doesn’t can help you decide how to proceed going forward.

 

4-Steps-to-Creating-a-Content-Marketing-Engine

4 Steps to Creating a Content Marketing Engine

4-Steps-to-Creating-a-Content-Marketing-Engine

Once you’ve decided that inbound marketing is right for you, what’s next? As enthusiastic as you may feel, it’s only natural to puzzle over how you’re supposed to go from being an traditional, advertising-heavy company to a creator and distributor of content that attracts, engages, and moves your audience through the marketing funnel. The answer? You need to create a content marketing engine so that content creation becomes easy and seamless. Here’s how.

1. Decide whether to insource or outsource your content. You can absolutely create your own content, and many companies do, but this is where some companies often run into problems. Either they cannot create the type of content they need to produce real results, or they simply aren’t good at producing it. There is no shame in that, and outsourcing is a ready solution. Here’s when you may need to outsource:

  • Creating enough quality, engaging content is a challenge
  • The people on your team are just not natural content creators
  • With all that you have to do in the course of your busy week, content creation may migrate to the bottom of your to-do list

Of course, if you have great writers in house, you may not need to outsource your content creation. But they may also have “day jobs” which makes it difficult to meet the demands of a hungry inbound marketing engine, so having an outside person help them manage deadlines and editorial calendars might help them focus on the writing itself, not the management of it.

2. Decide how to outsource. So outsourcing sounds like it’s for you? Now you have to decide how to do it. Here are some excellent choices:

  • Hire (and manage) a dedicated writer to craft content tailored for your ideal customers.
  • Crowdsource content from your community. You can opt for paid or unpaid content or a combination of both. If you choose unpaid, use non-monetary types of recognition/rewards for the content producer.
  • Hire influencers/bloggers. As a bonus, you get to leverage their reach and engage their often considerable followers.
  • Hire an agency to manage some or all of the above types of outsourcing. This is the least time-consuming, most stress-free option.

3. Create an editorial calendar. Organization is key to getting anything done, and the same goes for content creation. An editorial calendar not only helps you stay on task and remember when to write and publish, but also helps you focus on the right themes for reaching and converting your prospects.

In your calendar, include not only planned blog posts, but also all of your other inbound marketing content, including whitepapers, newsletters, emails, eBooks, events, and social media. For some insight into just how important an editorial calendar is, consider this: My blog editorial calendar template is the top requested download on my site.
editorial calendar gfx

4. Develop content topics: This is a team effort. Gather every content marketing idea you and/or your team can brainstorm. Be broad and think outside the box! Here’s how to get the best topic ideas:

  • Listen to your customers: You’re trying to engage, convert and delight them, so give them what they want. They’ll tell you what they want via social media, through emails, and by asking questions and sharing concerns with your customer service team.
  • Make a list: Don’t you hate forgetting great ideas? This is how you avoid that.
  • Answer all of your audience’s questions: You don’t want them looking elsewhere for answers.
  • Research keywords: Targeting keywords in your content will help you bring in search traffic.
  • Be honest: Being open and genuine will help you win not only friends but also customers.
  • Brainstorm regularly: Don’t expect your original content topics to serve you indefinitely. Always work towards finding new and better ideas for reaching your audience.
  • Talk about it: Don’t be afraid to talk about the competition or even write about controversial subjects. Controversy boosts traffic. Just makes sure you don’t stray from your company’s general norms and policies.
  • Try writing articles in the “versus” and “bests” formats (You vs. a competitor, best things about….). They generate a lot of interest and get shares.

No more excuses! These four steps are all you need to create a content marketing engine. Please let us know how it’s going for you in the comments.

This post is fourth in a series on how to use inbound marketing in your company marketing efforts. You may also be interested in the first post, What Is Inbound Marketing, and the second post, Creating Customer Personas for Inbound Marketing, and the third post, 7 Key Assets for Inbound Marketing

 

Creating Content for Inbound Marketing

Creating Content for Inbound Marketing

Creating Content for Inbound Marketing

Content is at the core of what inbound marketing is – it’s what attracts people to your brand, product or service, versus you needing to go out and find them. Think of content as the honey which attracts the flies!

Because it’s easier to start something new when you have a process, I offer you this method of creating content.

Step 1: Brainstorm themes for your content

You don’t want to write only about your product or service – would you want to read three blog posts a week about your product? So your content will cover both your product/service and adjacent or related themes – in some distance outside of your core. How far out you go depends on your product and industry; in a highly specialized area you may want to keep things fairly tight, but in a broader marketplace you can go pretty wide and still maintain relevancy to your company.

Themes are not titles or specific posts, they’re the overarching ideas that all of your content will address.

For example – some themes for my business, a digital marketing agency, are:

  • Marketing to teens, tweens & parents
  • How to create content/inbound marketing & social media strategy
  • How to use specific social media platforms
  • How inbound and digital marketing intersect with other marketing
  • Examples of companies doing content & social media well

Step 2: Brainstorm topics for your themes

Now you’re going to drill down – you’re going to develop some draft titles and specific ideas for your content. Choose one of your themes and come up with as many different topics as you can for that theme.

Some of the types of content you might create include:

  • Make a list
  • Answer a question
  • Talk about the competition
  • Use the “vs.” format
  • Write about “the best”
  • Outline a process
  • Provide examples
  • Curate other people’s examples or content
For my theme of “How to create content/inbound marketing & social media strategy,” topics could include:
  • 4 ways to use inbound marketing to solve customer problems
  • How to involve your whole team in your content creation
  • Why content creation saves time & money vs. traditional advertising
  • How to use influencers in your content creation strategy
  • Why you shouldn’t use bloggers as your social media agency

Step 3: Determine content types

This part will probably be pretty easy – make a list of all of the content types you currently create/offer and those you know you want to create. Content types could include:
  • Blog post
  • Video (short-form, like Instagram and Vine, and long-form, like YouTube videos)
  • Images
  • Podcast topic
  • Email
  • eBook
  • Whitepaper
  • Facebook update
  • Tweet
  • Slideshare
  • Webinar

Step 4: Align topics to content types

For each topic that you create, assign it to a specific content type.

Now comes the really hard part: you have to create the content! Once you have a list of topics you like, and know what kind of content you want to create for that topic, add that topic + content type to your editorial calendar.

Get the Content Creation Worksheet

I’ve created a brand-new worksheet which can help you with the brainstorming and content alignment process. Download it here, and please let me know how it works for you!

 

Critical Twitter Lessons to Aid Your Marketing

Critical Twitter Lessons to Aid Your Marketing

Critical Twitter Lessons to Aid Your Marketing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twitter is one of the big boys when it comes to social media marketing. If you’ve yet to begin using it for your business or don’t know how to use it well, this post is for you! The following articles will get you up to speed and help you use your Twitter account as an effective marketing tool.

The 2013 Twitter Marketing Guide

Maybe you’re new to Twitter. Maybe you’ve been using the social media site for years but only for personal connections. If you’re just now considering the social media platform for marketing purposes, this article can help. It provides everything from basic instructions for creating a Twitter profile and understanding Twitter lingo to tips for planning your strategy and building a following. Click here to learn the basics of using Twitter for marketing.

Five Ways to Use Twitter for Marketing That You Might Not Know About

Once you have the basics of Twitter marketing down, you may benefit from some additional ideas for using it for your business. This article provides information about ways to do the following:

  • Connect with mobile users via Twitter
  • Use search options to find relevant opportunities
  • Connect with journalists
  • Improve your search engine rankings

What else will you learn? You’ll also discover how to use your tweets in conjunction with Google Alerts to get search engine traffic and monitor what others are saying about your company. Read more about lesser-known ways to use Twitter.

Avoid These 9 Common Twitter Mistakes

The fact is that everyone makes mistakes. It’s all too easy to make a misstep here and a glaring error there. Fortunately, others have tripped and fallen before you, and you can learn from them. The author of this article, Timothy Carter, provides the details you need to avoid common problems, ranging from posting at the wrong times and sending vague tweets to being boring and messing up your privacy settings. For instance, something as simple as failing to follow other Twitter users is a mistake that may hold you back. Read more about common Twitter mistakes.

10 Lessons from the Top 25 Most Engaged Brands on Twitter

You can learn a lot from the successes of others. According to Mark Fidelman (writing for Forbes), engaging via Twitter requires companies to develop an emotional connection with their followers and effectively spread not their own message but an industry-specific one. Fidelman provides a list of 10 things companies of all sizes can learn from 25 of the most engaged brands on this social media platform. For example, telling stories, working with influencers, and driving emotion are among the top things you can do to better engage your audience. Read the reasons these top 25 brands do engagement so well.

 

How to Use Content Marketing for B2B Lead Generation

How to Use Content Marketing for B2B Lead Generation

How to Use Content Marketing for B2B Lead Generation

Content marketing is a primary lead generation tool. In fact, close to 70 percent of marketers use content marketing for lead generation. Why? It’s been proven over the years that it’s effective and beats out many other efforts at attracting leads. For example, studies demonstrate that many consumers are unimpressed with the plethora of ads they see each day, say “no” to telemarketing calls, and trash carefully crafted marketing messages sent through the postal mail. If 86 percent of potential customers skip ads, you need another way to reach them, and compelling content consistently performs in this area.

Your content, such as a blog, video, or eBooks and whitepapers, can also offer more than just lead generation. Take advantage of great content to help you throughout your lead cycle, to nurture and convert leads. Good content can help many aspects of your B2B business by:

●    Showing your prospects that you understand their needs

●    Helping your prospects get to know and evaluate your company and its products/services

●    Helping your prospects through the decision-making process

●    Providing support after a purchase and during implementation and use

●    Building customer loyalty

●    Encouraging repeat purchases

Sometimes content success can be difficult to come by. It’s not a magic bullet and not everyone does it well. Use these guidelines to help plan your B2B content marketing strategy and you’ll have leads flowing in no time.

Plan Well for Content

In order to enjoy success, you have to know who, why, and how. Consider the following questions as you plan for content marketing:

●    What are your specific goals and objectives?

●    Who is your audience?

●    What does your audience know? What does it need to know? What are its goals?

●    What do you want your audience to do? How can you encourage the actions you want?

●    How do you differ from your competition? How can you use your content to demonstrate the differences?

Create Content That Meets Your Audience’s Needs

You have compelling information to share, but just waiting until you’re asked for it isn’t a very effective strategy. Instead, you need to learn what your market needs and wants, what it finds interesting, what it finds boring, and what its burning questions are. Once you have answers to these questions, write compelling content that speaks to your audience’s needs and wants, stimulates its interest, and answers its most burning questions.

While you’re at it, be careful with what you share. Avoid content that is overly promotional or focuses on too much on your business. Instead, focus on providing information about the industry and talking about your audience.

Now, this doesn’t mean you can never include promotional content. There is a time and a place for promotional writing. The important thing is to stroke your audience first, make sure you have its attention, and develop a strong rapport. Then, you can insert more promotional content. But keep it to a minimum, so you don’t lose the audience you’ve worked so hard to develop.

Customize Content By Lead Stage

Think about the content that will best serve your audience at each stage of the lead cycle. At the very beginning, informational blogs, e-Books, white papers, websites, etc. make a good fit. Your content should, of course, inform, instruct, interest, and problem-solve. Later, however, after you’ve gotten your prospects interested in engaging with you, you can present your products and services in a more direct way, focusing on providing the solutions they need and adding demos and trials into the mix.

Don’t forget that you can deliver content throughout your lead cycle via email, newsletters, videos, and microsites as well.

Be Consistent

Once you’ve created compelling content for your audience, don’t stop there. To be successful at generating leads with content marketing, and to nurture your leads and get conversions, you have to provide compelling content on a consistent basis. Let your prospects know when they can expect to hear from you next and make them comfortable by delivering quality content on a regular basis.

Share It

Building it and expecting them to come won’t produce the results you expect. Instead, you’ll need to apply a carefully planned strategy to sharing your content and making it easy to find. Include:

●    Social media, including social networking, bookmarking, video, and image-posting sites

●    Search engine marketing (use Google AdWords to drive traffic directly to your content)

●    Other online advertising

●    Email

●    Online news releases

Collect Lead Data

It’s not enough just to put great content on your website.  Create a form which is ready to collect data from the leads you generate via content marketing.

Make your lead generation form easy to find, complete, and submit. Request just enough information to get started with the lead, as many prospects will feel put off or offended if you ask too much right off the bat. You can always collect more information later. Often, a name and email address is enough to collect at first, and you can easily obtain that by offering a free downloadable report and requesting an email address to which to send the link.

 

Now go forth and create, and capture those leads! And please check back with us and leave a comment to let us know how you’re doing.

Photo: Flickr (Lisa_Yarost)

 

blogging for brands

Common Questions about Blogging for Brands

blogging for brands

Co-authored by Stephanie Schwab and Christina Strickland

Your brand blog should be the cornerstone of your content marketing efforts. Yes, Facebook, Twitter and the rest are essential too but they shouldn’t be your only home on the web. It’s what both practice and teach here at Crackerjack Marketing. (You can read more about why here.)

If you’ve been reading our blog for a while, hopefully you understand the benefits of blogging for your brand. Whether you are new to blogging or a long-time content creator, you may have some questions.

How Often Should I Blog?

If you ask most people who have been blogging for a while, they’ll tell you, “The more, the better.” That’s because every post gives you exposure on the internet. It gives more people a chance to discover you because good content, updated frequently is one of the main reasons Google (or any search engine) uses to decide your fate in getting listed in search results.

The reality is that blogging is writing and if you are a beginner, you may find writing challenging. Writing a blog also takes time. But you’ll discover that the more you write, the better you get at writing and the easier it is to do. So let’s assume that you’re not going to be writing a blog post every day of the week to start. What schedule can you keep up with that is reliable? The most important advice we can offer is to get started and keep at it. Don’t let a week go by without at least one blog post. Once you get more comfortable with blogging, you should increase the frequency of your posts.

You’ll learn to write down ideas as they come to you, sketch out your posts and hit the keyboard. Blogging is a practice that requires discipline. Build from one post a week to two or three. That’s a frequency that will help you build your online presence quickly and start getting traffic, comments, and learn what’s of interest to your readers.

Blogging three times a week is an excellent rate. If you can continue at that pace, and assuming your content is relevant and helpful, you’ll see results much faster than starting slowly.

But for many, dipping your toe in the water is more realistic. With the idea that the goal is to get fully wet and start swimming, it’s fine to start off slowly. No matter what, though, no matter how little traffic you see in the beginning, do not quit. It takes time to see results. Slowly but surely, you’ll be discovered and read. You’ll meet people. The benefits of blogging will become apparent to you, and they are many.

Once you’ve committed to blogging, don’t think of it as an optional activity. Consider it as important to your business as paying the bills or opening your door in the morning.

How Long Should a Blog Post Be?

While you understand how important relevant, valuable content is to the success of your blog, you may have questions about length. If you visit a handful of blogs, you’re likely to see blog posts that vary considerably in terms of length. So how do you decide how long to make your posts? Which length will your readers prefer?

Many bloggers keep their posts to 250 to 500 words while others write closer to 2000 words each time. While longer posts can provide a good deal of detailed information and may help stimulate conversation, there are benefits to writing shorter posts. Among them are the following:

  • Tight focus: With a long blog post, you may feel tempted to wander a bit with your point, and in doing so, you may inadvertently lose your reader’s attention. When you write shorter posts, you have less room for wandering, and you’re more likely to stay tightly focused on your topic. Your readers will appreciate you for that.
  • Scanability: Most Internet users don’t read online content the way they read offline. Instead, they scan, looking for the highlights in posts and specific points of value. Short posts are easier to scan than long versions, but you can increase the scanability of any post by including bulleted or numbered lists, headings and subheadings, and short, easy-to-digest paragraphs.
  • Time: The longer your posts, the more time you will have to put into writing them. In fact, you may even put off writing longer posts because they do take up so much of your time. Since shorter posts require less time to create, you can post more often and have a better chance of keeping your readers’ attention and interest. Just think, if you only write once or twice a month because your long posts take so long to create, your readers may get tired of waiting and go elsewhere in search of the content they seek. If, on the other hand, you focus on shorter posts, you can write more often (perhaps once or twice a week) and provide regular content for your readers to digest.

Though there are benefits to writing short blog posts, this doesn’t mean you should NEVER write longer posts. If you have something of value to share, and you need 1000 or more words to share it well, then by all means, write a longer post. Your goal is to deliver well-written content that your audience will value, share, comment on, and come back to see more of. In the end, the length doesn’t matter as long as you meet this goal.

What Are Some Common Blogging Mistakes to Avoid?

Everyone makes mistakes. They are a natural part of life and running a business. But if you can learn from the mistakes others have made, you might make fewer of your own and enjoy a faster, smoother road to meeting your goals. Blogging for your business might seem simple and easy, but there are plenty of pitfalls that can get in your way. Here are four of the most common blogging mistakes business owners make and tips for avoiding them.

Sporadic Posts

Failing to blog regularly is one of the most common mistakes business bloggers make. Think about it: if you found a magazine you liked, but the publisher only sent it sporadically, how long would it be before you lost interest and moved on to different magazine? The same sort of scenario works with blogs. Sporadic content, no matter how good, sends readers looking for another blog that regularly posts content of value to them.

Keep your readership happy and interested by posting regularly. There are no hard-and-fast rules about the number of times you should post, but many bloggers find their readership satisfied with a couple of posts per week. Even if you decide to post just once a week, make sure you keep up with it to avoid losing the interest of your readers.

Unrealistic Expectations

It’s normal to have the highest hopes for your blog. Who doesn’t want to experience success? But expecting overnight blogging success is an all-too-common mistake. As with building a business, developing a successful blog takes time and hard work. Commit to devoting 12 months to developing your blog and cultivating your readership. Your job won’t end once you complete the first year, but it’s reasonable to see some encouraging results by then.

Focusing on Promotion

Many new business bloggers feel confused about the type of content they should post on their blogs. They often make the mistake of including too much promotional content. This can be a major mistake, as a business blog isn’t meant to serve as an advertisement. Instead, your blog should provide conversational content that is relevant and interesting to your readers. While it is okay to use your blog to make business announcements and share news of new products and services, much of your content should focus on industry news, hints, tricks, advice, how-to’s and insights into your industry and company. Keeping sales to a minimum will help you attract loyal readers.

Discouraging Conversation

Your business blog is an important tool for conversation and interaction, but many bloggers disable commenting. While their reasons for doing so, such as avoiding spam and negative comments, are often understandable, disabling the comment feature can impair your ability to connect and engage with your readers. Instead, you might find it easier to meet your blogging goals if you not only enable commenting but also encourage your readers to share their comments, questions, concerns and stories on your blog. Then, be sure to respond and keep the conversation going.

Even if you still have questions, we hope that you get started and keep going. The more you publish blog posts, the faster you’ll establish a drum beat. It’s okay if you need to change things up a little later. The important thing is to take action!