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7 Tips for Creating Marketing Messages that Stick

marketing-messages-that-stick
 
You try to create the most compelling marketing messages. You know how important it is to speak directly to your target audience and share ideas, features, and tips that will capture their attention. But try as you might, it seems like you’re pushing a bunch of boulders up a super-steep uphill. Your messages seem on-point to you, but your audience doesn’t seem to remember them. And if they do, they don’t seem to remember them long enough to buy your products and services. Never fear! You do have options—good options, actually.

Create Marketing Messages that Stick

Creating “sticky” messages can be a lot of fun. The key is to think like your audience thinks. Here are 7 more tips to get you rolling:

Know Your Audience

If you don’t know whom you’re talking to, you are dead in the water. It may seem like a good idea to create marketing messages that appeal to you, but this is simply the wrong way to go. Your target audience is unique, and it is key that your marketing messages speak to its members rather than to you, your friends, or the world at large.

Create Marketing Personas

You’ve probably noticed that your audience consists of more than one type of person. For example, your audience may consist of busy parents, senior citizens who travel a lot, and executives looking for ways to simply their lives. By creating personas, you can better understand the different segments of your target audience and create messages that speak to each segment.

Keep It Simple

Creativity is a good thing, but sometimes businesses create convoluted messages in an effort to be different and creative. Be careful that creating longer, more complicated messages doesn’t dilute your point and confuse your audience. Often, simple and to the point is more memorable and more likely to hit home.

Go for the Surprise Attack

Your audience is made up of people who have one thing in common. They hear the same things every day. They constantly hear that one brand is better than another. Marketing messages constantly tell them that they cannot possibly live without a product or service or that the only way to get superior quality is to choose company B over Company A. Because they hear these messages constantly, they gradually tune them out. There’s nothing new to be learned, so these types of messages become part of the background noise. But if you can surprise your audience, you can capture its members’ attention and then use their focus on you to give details they’ll need to choose you over the competition. Use surprising facts, interesting product uses, historical information, etc. to surprise your audience into listening and remembering your messages.

Get Visual

Today’s audiences are highly visual. Because of this, plain, old text can be seen as, at best, a little dry and, at worst, flat-out boring. If your messages are seen as boring, your audience is far less likely to remember them, at least not in any good way. The good news is you can take a simple message and give it life through mental and visual imagery. First, write out your message as you normally would. Then, add descriptions that help your audience visualize your message. This is great for provoking emotion, increasing interest, and stimulating memory. Now, go ahead and add images or video whenever possible. The combination of these steps will encourage your audience to not only pay attention but also share your message with others.

Engage Them With Show and Tell

Seeing is believing. Your marketing messages may be spot on, but people are always more likely to believe what you show them over what you tell then. Do create your simple, visual, targeted marketing messages. They are important, but don’t stop there. Create a couple of demonstrations as well to help your audience visualize what you’ve been telling them all along and ensure that they remember you and your products and services.

Tell Stories

People like to be entertained. Even when they are learning about something serious, they prefer to learn about it in a way that entertains and intrigues them. Give them what they want by creating stories that share something they didn’t know, highlight how your brand is different, illustrate that you understand them and get where they are coming from, and speak to their pain points. Your stories will provoke emotions in your customers and prospects, not only ensuring that they remember you but also helping them to feel connected to your brand.

It takes effort to create sticky marketing messages, but the rewards of doing so are measurable. Go ahead and try these 7 tips on for size. They’ll help make your marketing messages more memorable and encourage your audience to purchase from you.

Have tips for creating sticky marketing messages? We’d love to hear them! Share your tips in the comments section.

Critical Twitter Lessons to Aid Your Marketing

Critical Twitter Lessons to Aid Your Marketing

Critical Twitter Lessons to Aid Your Marketing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twitter is one of the big boys when it comes to social media marketing. If you’ve yet to begin using it for your business or don’t know how to use it well, this post is for you! The following articles will get you up to speed and help you use your Twitter account as an effective marketing tool.

The 2013 Twitter Marketing Guide

Maybe you’re new to Twitter. Maybe you’ve been using the social media site for years but only for personal connections. If you’re just now considering the social media platform for marketing purposes, this article can help. It provides everything from basic instructions for creating a Twitter profile and understanding Twitter lingo to tips for planning your strategy and building a following. Click here to learn the basics of using Twitter for marketing.

Five Ways to Use Twitter for Marketing That You Might Not Know About

Once you have the basics of Twitter marketing down, you may benefit from some additional ideas for using it for your business. This article provides information about ways to do the following:

  • Connect with mobile users via Twitter
  • Use search options to find relevant opportunities
  • Connect with journalists
  • Improve your search engine rankings

What else will you learn? You’ll also discover how to use your tweets in conjunction with Google Alerts to get search engine traffic and monitor what others are saying about your company. Read more about lesser-known ways to use Twitter.

Avoid These 9 Common Twitter Mistakes

The fact is that everyone makes mistakes. It’s all too easy to make a misstep here and a glaring error there. Fortunately, others have tripped and fallen before you, and you can learn from them. The author of this article, Timothy Carter, provides the details you need to avoid common problems, ranging from posting at the wrong times and sending vague tweets to being boring and messing up your privacy settings. For instance, something as simple as failing to follow other Twitter users is a mistake that may hold you back. Read more about common Twitter mistakes.

10 Lessons from the Top 25 Most Engaged Brands on Twitter

You can learn a lot from the successes of others. According to Mark Fidelman (writing for Forbes), engaging via Twitter requires companies to develop an emotional connection with their followers and effectively spread not their own message but an industry-specific one. Fidelman provides a list of 10 things companies of all sizes can learn from 25 of the most engaged brands on this social media platform. For example, telling stories, working with influencers, and driving emotion are among the top things you can do to better engage your audience. Read the reasons these top 25 brands do engagement so well.

 

We're All Search Marketers Now

We’re All Search Marketers Now

We're All Search Marketers Now

As social media grows and matures, it seems pretty clear that there are a few aspects of this integrated discipline that are becoming increasingly important, yet are undeveloped skills in most social media practitioners.  One such aspect is search marketing.

Just a few short years ago search engine optimization (SEO) was a highly specialized discipline, and primarily was being executed within standalone SEO firms and some digital agencies.   The guys (yeah, mostly guys, though a few gals too) who were search experts often had coding backgrounds, and they really understood the nuts-and-bolts of how the search engines, and websites, worked.  They used this info to help static websites get noticed by the engines, and then they extended that knowledge into paid search, also called PPC (pay-per-click) or search engine marketing (SEM).  Blogs came along and they figured out the best ways to optimize those too.  If you needed to build a website or blog, or run a PPC campaign, you knew who to call.

These days, it’s not quite so simple. Sure, you can (and should) still call in the big guns when you’re building a website from scratch.  But lots and lots of agencies: PR, digital and pure-play social, are building client blogs.  Do those firms hire an SEO company every time they build a blog?  Not if they’re smart.  Those that understand the importance of a properly-optimized blog (and the properly-optimized writing that goes into it) have built up enough SEO expertise in-house (or have developers who have) to be able to create and implement a search-friendly blog and then train the writers on at least basic best practices of search-optimized writing.

Search marketing now goes far beyond websites and blogs.  It’s part of nearly every aspect of social media, from Twitter to YouTube, Facebook to Flickr.  But many social media practitioners or front-line engagers don’t realize how pervasive it is and they’re not always fully equipped to manage search optimization on social platforms.  Want proof?  Look at how many brands haven’t used every available text space on their Facebook page, or who don’t add brand keywords to their YouTube videos.

YouTube can be optimized for search

So speaking of YouTube, did you know that you can optimize videos on YouTube?  Including the right keywords, writing keyword-rich descriptions and uploading video transcripts (yup, you can do that) can all have a big impact on how easily your video is found in YouTube – and in other search engines, such as Google, as well.

Twitter profiles are important

Twitter search is getting more important, and more complex, every day.  Twitter can be a very powerful tool to get your brand ranked in search engines.  It all starts with your profile – even if you can’t get your perfect username, you can make up for it by using your real name/brand name as your Actual Name in Twitter – so if your brand name is “Brand Blue,” using exactly that as your Actual Name will be more effective than being “Erin at Blue.”  From that simple start, there are a number of other key Twitter SEO practices to follow; because of Google’s near-instant indexing of its content, quick fixes on Twitter can often make a big difference.

Search optimization for Facebook is complicated

And Facebook … ah, Facebook.  With 500 million + users, the search potential within Facebook seems pretty great.  However, their search function is not clearly optimizable and it’s improving only slowly.  It is true that there are some best practices for Facebook search optimization, including appropriate keyword use (in your info page, photo titles, and status updates); choosing the right name/URL for your Facebook page; and using the About text box (left sidebar) for keyword-rich copy.  Another tiny tip is to use a tall image for your brand logo – you’ll command more space in the search results page.  Try it and see.

How to catch up and learn more about search optimization for social?

So what can you, the social media practitioner, do to expand your knowledge about search?  I recommend starting by adding a few SEO blogs to your blog reader.  Some of the posts will be pretty techie, and they won’t all apply to what you do every day, but I can just about guarantee you’ll start to feel smarter about search in just a couple of weeks.  Maybe set up some Twitter keyword searches (yet another form of social search!) for “twitter + SEO” or “facebook + SEO.”  Breathe it all in – you might find it really appeals to you as a new concept to master.

And the next time your firm hires an SEO specialist to work on a site or a blog, get involved, listen and learn.  You can no longer afford to have a “not my department” attitude.

How does your firm or company manage search marketing in relation to social media?  As a social media practitioner, do you feel like you know a lot about search or are you just taking baby steps?  The comments are yours.

This post originally appeared at Social Media Explorer.